Are You Creating the Right Climate So Your Team Can Do More, Be More? Sports records provide tangible evidence of the positive changes that can occur when the right climate has been established.

One Olympic athlete, Parry O’Brien, won a gold medal at the 1952 Olympics by throwing a 16 pound shot 57 feet. In 1953 he set a new world record by throwing the shot 59 feet, 3/4 inch.

Experts at the time said O’Brien, the best in the world, might beat his record by a few inches if he practiced, but they were certain that no one would ever be able to break the 60 foot barrier.

Luckily, O’Brien didn’t think like an expert! As an athlete he was determined to continue improving himself. He began experimenting with different styles and invented a new technique for his event, which would become the universal style of putting the shot until the mid1970s.

In 1956 O’Brien won at the Olympics again—not by a few inches, but by a few feet. He also broke the unbreakable barrier by tossing the shot 60 feet, 11 inches.

O’Brien set his final record in 1959 when he threw the shot 63 feet, 4 inches. From that time on, every competitive shot-putter has tossed the shot beyond that length. Today, the record is over 75 feet.

The same is true of the four minute mile. No one, the experts said, would ever be able to run the mile in less than four minutes. Then, in 1954, a young medical student named Roger Bannister did the impossible by breaking that barrier.

Today, every world-class runner can run the mile in less than four minutes.

Why?

Because one man decided to keep improving.

One man decided to pay the price of personal growth.

He was willing to lead. As a result, he created a climate for those achievers who followed him.

Are you the type of leader who is willing to pay the price and create a climate in which your people can follow you and emerge as the leaders of tomorrow?

Let’s find out.

The environment in which you work will influence you and those you lead. Answer the following questions to help determine your organization’s dedication to developing leaders and providing a climate that promotes organizational and personal growth.

QUESTIONS TO ASK CONCERNING ORGANIZATIONAL GROWTH

1. Has the organization made a specific commitment to grow and develop people? (Seldom, Sometimes, or Usually)

2. Is the organization willing to spend money to develop employees’ growth? (Seldom, Sometimes, or Usually)

3. Is the organization willing to make changes to keep itself and its people growing? (Seldom, Sometimes, or Usually)

4. Does the organization support leaders willing to make the difficult decisions necessary for people’s personal growth and the growth of the organization? (Seldom, Sometimes, or Usually)

5. Does the organization place an emphasis on production rather than position or title? (Seldom, Sometimes, or Usually)

6. Does the organization provide growth opportunities for its people? (Seldom, Sometimes, or Usually)

7. Do organizational leaders have vision and share it with their people? (Seldom, Sometimes, or Usually)

8.Does the organization think big? (Seldom, Sometimes, or Usually)

9. Does the organization promote from within? (Seldom, Sometimes, or Usually)

10. Are there other leaders in the organization willing to pay the price of personal sacrifice to ensure their growth and the growth of others? (Seldom, Sometimes, or Usually)

If the majority of the answers to these questions is Seldom or Sometimes, a change is in order.
If the organization is controlled by you, begin changing now.

If you head a department in the organization, then you are in a position to make
positive changes. Do as many things as your organization will allow to create a positive climate for potential leaders.

If you are in a position only to make changes for yourself, try to find someone in the organization who will develop you—or change your job.

Great leaders share themselves and what they have learned with the learners who will become tomorrow’s leaders. A person can impress potential leaders from a distance, but only from up close can he impact them. Great leaders share themselves and what they have learned.

“If you really want to grow your business, you have to grow your people.” –John Maxwell

So, what are you doing to create a climate for potential leaders?

Training and coaching you and your team will help you create a climate for potential leaders so they can be more and do more. Click here for more information now.