Making the most of a bad experience
How hard have you been hit? And how much pain are you in? When you feel the pain of bad experiences, creativity gives you the opportunity to turn that pain into gain. Here’s a secret to changing pain into gain.

There’s a story about a chicken farmer whose land was flooded just about every spring. He didn’t want to give up his farm and move. He wasn’t a quitter. Yet.

But when the water backed up onto his land and flooded his chicken coops, it was always a struggle to get his chickens to higher ground. Some years he couldn’t move fast enough and hundreds of chickens drowned. I’d be crying right now, you?

After experiencing the worst spring he’d ever had, and losing his entire flock, he walked into the farmhouse and said to his wife, “I’ve had it. I can’t do this anymore. I can’t afford to buy another place. And I can’t sell this one. I don’t know what to do.

Thinking creatively, his wife said, “Buy ducks.”

Use the energy that comes from either adrenaline or anger and use it to solve problems and learn lessons. 

John Maxwell says, “Creativity begins at the end of your comfort zone.” When you feel the pain of heart-sickening experiences, creativity gives you the opportunity and the fuel to turn that pain into gain.

When you have a tough experience, one that discourages you in a big way, let it prompt your creativity.

Pick one big bad difficult situation in your life. Take some time to think, and write down 3 ways you can think up a creative way to use that situation to your advantage.

One of the challenges my husband and I have faced all of our married life (24 years and counting) is that he can’t hear well. He was born without ear drums. He didn’t even have holes in his ears like most of us do!

After multiple surgeries, learning how to read lips, and now having a super-sonic hearing aid, Ted hears better. But not perfectly. But I tell you what – we’ve had a choice to make regarding his inability to hear well.

We could allow it to annoy us, we could complain that it’s hard to communicate. We could be mad that it’s hard for him to have one-on-one conversations with people. We could even be bitter that he sometimes misses out on important information because he doesn’t hear it right.

OR we could think outside the box and learn other ways to communicate. Over the last 24 years, we’ve developed quite a few tricks in sending and receiving messages.

Just a look, and he knows what I’m thinking. Just a touch and he knows what I am trying to express. Just a nod and he catches my drift.

Our communication has risen to another level than what most people experience – all because we decided to use our angst about a problem or situation and solve it creatively.

How are you going to solve your big problem? How are you going to turn your pain into your gain?

Yes, that one that makes you angry…
That one that disappoints you…
The situation that isn’t fair, but it’s yours…

Use that experience to get your creative juices flowing. You’re backed by the power of God in this situation and he’s at your disposal. Tug on his ear, he’s just a whisper away. He’s ready to dive in and help you figure out a way to make the most of your bad experience with creative ideas.

You can do all things if you believe… (Phil 4:13)

You can turn your pain into gain…if you believe.

Comment below and let us know how you’re making the most of your bad experiences with creativity.

When’s the last time you cried during a tough time?  It’s so tempting to think being a rock means holding back the tears. But on this podcast, I share how ignoring the sting of hurt or loss and hoping it just might go away is so…WRONG!

Do Strong People Cry?

You’ll hear me share a touching story about what happened this past week, when my best friend’s dad passed away … and who ended up doing the crying. You’ll also hear how my son reacted to his sister when she had a melt down.

This podcast, “Do Strong People Cry” will help you:

  • Learn what happens when you push away the pain and pretend it doesn’t hurt.
  • Discover how not crying affects your physical, mental, and emotional well-being.
  • Be more comfortable when other people cry in your presence.

By the end of this podcast you’ll have the courage you need to cry and be strong.

Listen to this edition of the “Christianity Made Easy” Podcast below or in iTunes.

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If You Want to Feel Better – Go Ahead, Cry! Feel the Pain!
If You Want to Feel Better – Go Ahead, Cry! Feel the Pain!
by Linda Travelute, Ph.D.

“Do I have to be strong when I hurt so much?” This is a common question when someone has endured a traumatic situation or has just lost a loved one.

Finding the courage to be strong when your world has been blown apart seems like a great idea. There’s such a temptation to be a rock and hold back the tears. That’s the noble, nice thing to do. After all, it would make it easier on your family and loved ones. They wouldn’t see you in pain and then they wouldn’t feel as bad as they try to sympathize and comfort you. Actually, it seems like a grand idea to just ignore the sting of hurt or loss hoping it just might go away. Wrong! You can push away the pain and pretend it doesn’t hurt but doing so will endanger your health and your emotional well-being.

God was so smart creating us with the ability to cry. Crying is a valve that releases pain. When tears flow harmful toxins in our bodies are able to escape. Have you noticed that after a good cry you feel so much better? That’s because you’ve let some of the junk seep out. Yes, you may feel tired and drained from sobbing and weeping but no doubt you feel relieved.

Think back. Maybe as a kid, you had a crying spell and a parent or grown up looked at you and said: “Stop crying!” Yes, they meant well, but that’s why there are people who do not know how to release their emotions. Those words come back to haunt them the moment they feel a tear form in the corner of their eye. They shut it down. And as result, shut down a way that God gave us to heal the pain.

I say…”Go ahead and cry!” When I officiate a funeral one of the first things I do is gather the grieving family and loved ones together and let them know it’s ok to cry.  I even ask them to give each other permission to cry. When people in my office start to cry I don’t rush to hand them a tissue. Some may think this is rude, but usually when you hand someone a tissue, they take it as a signal to stop crying. I’ll let people get a good sob going before I hand them a tissue to wipe their face. I want them to cry and feel the tears trickle down their cheeks.

One reason we don’t like to see people cry is because it makes us feel bad. One day my youngest child, Tiffany, was boo hooing over a situation. She was really going at it, holding nothing back. My oldest child, Tyler, tried to comfort her. Yet he secretly had an ulterior motive. His desire was for her to stop her tears. I said, “Tyler, it’s ok for her to cry; she feels bad right now.” He responded, “I don’t like it when she cries because it makes me sad.” There it is! That’s why we don’t want people crying in our presence. Because it causes us discomfort. We would rather cheer people up and brighten their day and ours. What this does though, is deny the hurt person the opportunity to feel and get over their pain. That’s why the Bible says, “Don’t sing songs to a heavy heart.” Forget trying to cheer them up; it won’t make the pain go away. Contrary to what we believe, it can cause them to bury it. God wants them to release their tears which will help restore their torn lives.

No, you don’t have to be strong when you’re in pain. Neither do I. Let’s get comfortable allowing people to cry in our presence and even get to the place where we will allow ourselves to cry in the presence of others. It’s a great gift we can give ourselves and those we love. Let’s go ahead and cry. It will do our bodies good!